11 Oct 2017

7 Ways in Home Health Care Can Improve the Quality of Life for Seniors

    

Topics: Home Care

Talking to your aging parents about in home health care can be difficult. While having a conversation about senior home care isn’t easy, it has to happen. Your parents’ quality of life can be improved in many ways thanks to in home health care.

Discussing these benefits with your parents may encourage them to allow caregivers into their home. Here are seven ways in home health care can improve the quality of life for seniors.

1. It Helps Them Remain in Their Own Homes

About 90 percent of seniors want to stay in their own homes as they get older. They’ve spent many years in their homes, and their homes are a familiar, safe space. Without in home health care, they could need to move to an assisted living facility.

Being forced to move out of your home isn’t great for your quality of life. With help from caregivers, seniors are able to stay in their own homes, where they’re happy and comfortable.

2. It Gives Them Someone to Talk To

Many older people feel lonely. Since they’re retired, they don’t get to interact with all their work friends anymore. They may not see their friends or family members as much as they’d like. A friendly caregiver gives them someone to talk to on a regular basis. Caregivers and seniors are matched based on personality, so they’ll get along. In some cases, seniors and their caregivers can go on to become close friends.

3. It Helps Them Pursue Favourite Hobbies

Aging can make it harder for people to pursue their favourite hobbies. Mobility issues or arthritis can make hobbies like gardening a lot harder. Memory problems can interfere with hobbies like scrapbooking.

Not being able to pursue your favourite hobbies isn’t a good feeling. With caregivers, seniors can get the assistance they need to continue with their pastimes.

4. It Reduces Transportation Issues

Seniors may struggle with transportation issues. Many conditions can make driving more difficult or even impossible. Without being able to drive, it’s hard to visit friends or get to doctor’s appointments.

Feeling trapped in the house can be upsetting, but caregivers can help. Caregivers can help take seniors to the places they need to go.

5. It Helps Them Eat Healthy Meals

Poor nutrition is very common among older people. Estimates vary, but between 15 and 50 percent of the elderly population is thought to suffer from poor nutrition or malnutrition. Physical limitations, like poor eyesight or sore joints, can make cooking a lot harder than it used to be.

Having in home health care means seniors can eat healthy, nutritious meals prepared by their caregivers.

6. It Lets Them Keep Their Pets

No one wants to have to give up their beloved pets. Seniors with physical limitations may feel like they need to do that. If seniors aren’t able to feed their pets, clean up after them, or take them for walks, they may feel upset about the idea of giving up their pets.

Caregivers can help seniors with some of their pet care tasks, which helps them keep their pets. This helps them maintain a good quality of life.

7. It Helps Them Enjoy Clean Homes

Living in a messy environment isn’t pleasant. Clutter makes people feel anxious and overwhelmed, and it’s a tripping hazard. Dirty dishes can smell bad or attract pests, like rodents.

Seniors who can’t keep up with their housework may feel trapped in a messy or dangerous home. Caregivers can help with light housekeeping tasks and make the home cleaner and safer. Seniors can relax and enjoy their clean homes.

How-to-Have-a-Conversation-about-Senior-Home-Care

Tennille Kerrigan

Tenille is the president of Senior Helpers Canada, the premier franchise that delivers on what families and their loved ones need most. She has bachelor’s degree in business administration from York University, and has over 10 years of experience as a business owner and director. With Senior Helpers, our franchisees provide the professionalism and expert care that families and their aging loved ones require.

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